Little League Pitch Count Guidelines

  • Last updated Aug. 27, 2015
Youth pitching program
ATTENTION PITCHERS: One of the big misconceptions in baseball is that playing the game keeps you in shape to pitch. I wish that was true. It's not. To get to the next level, preparation matters. Big league pitchers spend far more time preparing to pitch than actually pitching. If you believe adding velocity could be critical to your success, check out my proven programs for pitchers of all ages.

Photo title
Image source: pitcherlist.com

Little League Baseball implemented a new pitch-count rule in 2007, a change organizers hope will reduce wear and tear on youngsters' arms.

Now, the number of pitches thrown in a game will determine how long that player must rest before returning to the mound. The current system is based on innings pitched.

The new rules would bar 11- and 12-year-old players from throwing more than 85 pitches a day, with limits also varying with age.

Rest requirements would change according to the number of pitches thrown. A pitcher who tosses more than 61 in a game would need three days of rest before returning to the mound, while someone who throws between 41 and 60 pitches would need two days off.

Pitch count restrictions, based on age:

* For pitchers 17-18: 105 pitches
* For pitchers 13-16: 95 pitches
* For pitchers 11-12: 85 pitches
* For pitchers 10 and under: 75 pitches

Pitchers league ages 7 through 16 must adhere to the following rest requirements:

* If a player pitches 61 or more pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest must be observed.
* If a player pitches 41-60 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest must be observed.
* If a player pitches 21-40 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar day of rest must be observed.
* If a player pitches 1-20 pitches in a day, no calendar day of rest is required before pitching again.

Pitchers league age 17-18 must adhere to the following rest requirements:

* If a player pitches 76 or more pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest must be observed.
* If a player pitches 51-75 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest must be observed.
* If a player pitches 26-50 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar day of rest must be observed.
* If a player pitches 1-25 pitches in a day, no calendar day of rest is required before pitching again.

Get my pitching velocity program

Youth pitching program
One of the big misconceptions in baseball is that playing the game keeps you in shape to pitch. I wish that was true. It's not. To get to the next level, preparation matters. Big league pitchers spend far more time preparing to pitch than actually pitching.

If you believe adding velocity could be critical to your success, check out my proven programs for pitchers of all ages.

What do you think?

Now it's time to hear from you:

Are there any additional tips that I missed?

Or maybe you have an idea of how I can make this article even better.

Either way, leave a comment and let me know.




Get exclusive pitching tips

Are you in yet? Click the button below and enter your email to get advanced pitching strategies that I ONLY share with my 87,431 newsletter subscribers. (This is where I share my best material, and it's FREE!)

Get Exclusive Tips From Steven »

Seriously, pitchers and coaches are loving these tips

Great reviews of Steven Ellis exclusive baseball pitching tips