Pitching Blisters

  • Last updated Aug. 27, 2015

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Image source: pitcherlist.com

Baseball pitchers, of course, throw quite a bit during the season. But all that throwing often can lead to the development of pitching blisters.
If you're prone to pitching blisters, it's because your finger skin is rubbing against a finger nail or the seams of the baseball, causing friction and irritation. You know, those nasty, painful sores that, in the wrong spot, can prevent you from pitching effectively. In some instances, they may even sideline you for a game or two.

If you're prone to pitching blisters, it's because your finger skin is rubbing against a finger nail or the seams of the baseball, causing friction and irritation. Most of the time, pitching blisters happen early in a season — or during some of the initial throwing that takes place during the preseason. That's because the skin's "toughness" has not yet developed to handle the repetition of throwing. But many pitchers find that their blister problems linger into the regular season. And that, of course, is not good.

Four Ways To Treat Pitching Blisters

You should use emery boards and finger nail cutters on a regular basis to keep your nails at the length of your finger tips — not shorter or longer.

To prevent blisters under calluses, you can gently use an emery board to softly get rid of hardened skin that has developed. (A first-round draft pick from my college baseball team did this every day throughout the course of a season.)

Apply a hand lotion after pitching also helps keep the skin from blistering.

And no, pickle juice does not prevent blisters or expedite the healing process. That's an old wives' tale that doesn't work :-)

Remember, you can't pitch effectively with a Band-aid or athletic tape on your throwing fingers. And at the higher levels of the game, you're is not allowed to have a Band-aid or athletic tape on your throwing fingers at all. That's why a $5 investment at the local drug store in a nail cutter and/or an emery board could be the very best investment you make toward your baseball pitching career, if you're prone to blisters on your pitching fingers. It might be the difference between making your next start — or watching from the dugout.

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